Child Welfare Practice With Families Affected by Parental Incarceration

child welfare gateway

When children are separated from their parents due to incarceration-possible coupled with out-of-home care-they may experience a variety of negative outcomes. According to the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), approximately 8 percent of all children who entered care in 2013 did so because of parental incarceration. The intersection of child welfare and parental incarceration is a growing concern for child welfare and related professionals.

Our new bulletin for professionals, Child Welfare Practice With Families Affected by Parental Incarceration, provides an overview of the scope of this issue; highlights practices to facilitate parent-child visits during incarceration, include parents in case planning, and work towards reunification; and points to resources to help caseworkers in their practice with these children and families. Working with incarcerated parents and their families has many barriers for child welfare caseworkers, but there are resources available that can help them overcome these challenges and improve outcomes for these children and families.

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Evaluation of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners, 2015

Evaluation of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners, 2015

As part of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners (MFS-IP), twelve grantees received funding from the Office of Family Assistance to implement activities to support and sustain marriages and families of fathers during and after incarceration. Grantees also provided reentry, parenting, education, and employment services. The evaluation includes publications such as research briefs, reviews of promising practices, and implementation data.

Website: https://peerta.acf.hhs.gov/content/evaluation-marriage-and-family-strengthening-grants-incarcerated-and-reentering-fathers-and

The Evaluation of the Re-Integration of Ex-Offenders (RExO) Program: Two-Year Impact Report

The Evaluation of the Re-Integration of Ex-Offenders (RExO) Program: Two-Year Impact Report, May 2015

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Re-Integration of Ex-Offenders Program provides three main types of services to ex-offenders: mentoring, including one-on-one and group mentoring; employment services such as work readiness training, job training, job placement, job clubs, transitional employment, and post-placement follow-up; and case management and supportive services. This report summarizes the initial impacts of the RExO program on offender outcomes in four areas: service receipt, labor market success, recidivism, and other outcomes. The findings suggest that RExO significantly increased the number and types of services received by ex-offenders.

Website: https://peerta.acf.hhs.gov/content/evaluation-re-integration-ex-offenders-rexo-program-two-year-impact-report

Evaluation of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners,

Evaluation of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners, 2015

As part of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners (MFS-IP), twelve grantees received funding from the Office of Family Assistance to implement activities to support and sustain marriages and families of fathers during and after incarceration. Grantees also provided reentry, parenting, education, and employment services. The evaluation includes publications such as research briefs, reviews of promising practices, and implementation data.

Website Link: https://peerta.acf.hhs.gov/content/evaluation-marriage-and-family-strengthening-grants-incarcerated-and-reentering-fathers-and

 

The True Cost of Incarceration on Families

The True Cost of Incarceration on Families

More than one in three families with a loved one in jail or prison have been pushed into debt by the costs of incarceration, according to a new report by the Ella Baker Center.

Reducing incarceration rates and removing barriers to access jobs and services for returning residents can strengthen economic security for the 2.4 million people in jail or prison and their families and communities. Read the report and join the conversation on Twitter at #WhoPays?

Website: http://ellabakercenter.org/who-pays-get-the-report